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Top IoT Projects: 8 Case Studies

  • Top IoT Projects: 8 Case Studies

    Internet of Things
    Forward-thinking companies are already putting the Internet of Things to work for them in a wide variety of different ways.
  • 1. Daimler Trucks North America

    Trucks

    Industrial applications are likely to be one of the biggest markets for IoT technology, and smart factories are one of the most important industrial uses cases. Cisco points to its work with the Daimler Trucks North America production facility in Portland, Ore., that makes vehicles for Western Star trucks as a case study in how IoT deployment can help manufacturers become more productive.

    Each truck that comes down the line in Portland is highly customized — "no two are alike," said Paul Erdy, plant manager for Western Star Trucks. As a result, getting the right components for the right truck at the right time is a very complicated process. Working with Cisco and Rockwell Automation, the factory upgraded its infrastructure and installed new wireless IoT sensors and other devices that enabled the company to streamline its operations and become much more efficient. In addition, the data collected by the sensors is available to managers so that they can stay informed about the status of each vehicle on the assembly line.

    Image Source: Daimler Trucks North America

  • 2. Taiwan YouBike

    Smart bicycles

    Taiwan's YouBike is a public bicycle system that allows people to rent bikes for a short period of time with the first thirty minutes free. It operates in four different cities, where it has more than 700 stations. Each of the bicycles is outfitted with RFID sensors, and IoT devices in the docking stations, kiosk and gateway terminals help YouBike monitor the status of its fleet. The technology, provided by Intel, Advantech and Microprogram, helped the system support rapid growth, climbing from 150,000 users to more than 3.3 million. It now processes more than 100,000 transactions per day. And all that data is transmitted to cloud-based servers for analysis that enables management to keep the service running smoothly.

    Image Source: YouBike

  • 3. Weka Smart Fridge

    Weka Smart Fridge

    According to the World Health Organization, around 1.5 million children die worldwide every year from diseases that could have been prevented with vaccines. Part of the problem is that many vaccines require constant refrigeration, and that hasn't always been possible in parts of the globe where the power supply is unreliable.

    To solve the problem, Weka used Microsoft technology to develop an IoT-enabled smart vaccine refrigerator that is small enough to fit in a van, ensures a constant temperature and automates vaccine storing, tracking and dispensing. It can deliver pro-active alerts if temperatures begin to fluctuate, and the cloud-based big data analytics helps health care providers get the right amount of vaccines to the right clinics.

    Image Source: Microsoft

  • 4. Tyréns AB Smart Building

    Tyréns AB Smart Building

    Based in Sweden, Tyréns AB is a consulting firm that, among other projects, helps create better, safer and more sustainable buildings and communities. To help it understand how buildings are used, the firm embarked on a massive project with help from IBM, Intel, Yanzi and SVSi to install 1,000 IoT sensors throughout its own headquarters. Those sensors collected data on everything from the temperature in different rooms to how many people accessed different spaces to how often chairs in the conference rooms moved and even to how often the restrooms were used. (Did you know people make 3.6 visits to the bathroom on Monday but only 2.6 on Friday?) Analyzing the data collected has yielded incredibly valuable insights into building management that Tyréns has been able to apply to its own operations and share with clients.

    Image Source: IBM Video

  • 5. GTX Shoes

    GTX Shoes

    Having a mobile phone in the sole of your shoe might seem like a gimmicky novelty, but it's more like a matter of life and death for people who buy GTX's SmartSoles. Developed with IoT technology from Telefónica, these wearables were designed for people with dementia, autism, cognitive impairments or other disabilities that put them at risk for getting lost. The SmartSoles automatically transmit data about the wearer's location, allowing caregivers and relatives to find their loved ones quickly and easily by accessing a Web portal or smartphone app. Because it's in the shoes, no one can see it, and the patient doesn't have to remember to carry or put on anything unusual. It costs $299.00, plus a $74.95 quarterly or $29.95 monthly fee.

    Image Source: GTX

  • 6. Atlas Global Solutions Lighting

    Smart Lighting

    Smart lighting is becoming more popular with homeowners, but it is actually much more valuable in commercial and industrial settings. Atlas Global Solutions had a relatively new 200,000-square-foot manufacturing facility in Sutton, Mass., but an energy audit showed that the building's lighting system was using far too much energy — 1.3 million KW hours of electricity per year. By installing a smart LED lighting system from Digital Lumens, the company was able to reduce energy consumption by 1.25 million KW hours, a 55 percent decrease in the factory's total energy usage. The dramatic results helped the company earn an award from Energy Manager Today.

    Image Source: Digital Lumens

  • 7. Cornelius Smart Beverage Dispensers

    Cornelius Smart Beverage Dispensers

    Cornelius makes drink dispensers for beer, cider, juices, teas, frozen drinks, and other beverages. The company wanted to transform its operations by adding IoT sensors to its devices, which would allow it to collect and analyze data on its machines. With help from developers at Trek10, the company built a new IoT system that leverages Amazon Web Services offerings like the AWS IoT platform, Lambda and Kinesis Firehouse. Today, the company is able to detect most maintenance and support needs proactively before receiving a call from customers, and it has also used the monitoring data to improve its supply chain and marketing efforts. Plus, the back-end IT infrastructure costs are extremely low — just a few dollars per machine per year.

    Image Source: Cornelius

  • 8. Epic Fruit

    Oranges

    Based in Robertson, South Africa, Epic Fruit sends oranges, lemons, plums, peaches and nectarines all over the world. But like most produce, the company's fruits are sensitive to changes in temperature and require careful handling in order to arrive at supermarkets undamaged. To get a better picture of what was happening with its fruit in transit, the company installed an IoT system from MOST that automatically tracks location, temperature and other data about containers. It uploads that information to Internet-based dashboards automatically so that managers can see what is going on with their shipments. Based on this new intelligence, the company can make better decisions about where to send its shipments and when, and when it needs to take action to prevent damage to its produce.

    Image Source: Pixabay

  • 1 of

Top IoT Projects: 8 Case Studies

  • 1 of
  • Internet of Things

    Top IoT Projects: 8 Case Studies

    Forward-thinking companies are already putting the Internet of Things to work for them in a wide variety of different ways.
  • Trucks

    1. Daimler Trucks North America

    Industrial applications are likely to be one of the biggest markets for IoT technology, and smart factories are one of the most important industrial uses cases. Cisco points to its work with the Daimler Trucks North America production facility in Portland, Ore., that makes vehicles for Western Star trucks as a case study in how IoT deployment can help manufacturers become more productive.

    Each truck that comes down the line in Portland is highly customized — "no two are alike," said Paul Erdy, plant manager for Western Star Trucks. As a result, getting the right components for the right truck at the right time is a very complicated process. Working with Cisco and Rockwell Automation, the factory upgraded its infrastructure and installed new wireless IoT sensors and other devices that enabled the company to streamline its operations and become much more efficient. In addition, the data collected by the sensors is available to managers so that they can stay informed about the status of each vehicle on the assembly line.

    Image Source: Daimler Trucks North America

  • Smart bicycles

    2. Taiwan YouBike

    Taiwan's YouBike is a public bicycle system that allows people to rent bikes for a short period of time with the first thirty minutes free. It operates in four different cities, where it has more than 700 stations. Each of the bicycles is outfitted with RFID sensors, and IoT devices in the docking stations, kiosk and gateway terminals help YouBike monitor the status of its fleet. The technology, provided by Intel, Advantech and Microprogram, helped the system support rapid growth, climbing from 150,000 users to more than 3.3 million. It now processes more than 100,000 transactions per day. And all that data is transmitted to cloud-based servers for analysis that enables management to keep the service running smoothly.

    Image Source: YouBike

  • Weka Smart Fridge

    3. Weka Smart Fridge

    According to the World Health Organization, around 1.5 million children die worldwide every year from diseases that could have been prevented with vaccines. Part of the problem is that many vaccines require constant refrigeration, and that hasn't always been possible in parts of the globe where the power supply is unreliable.

    To solve the problem, Weka used Microsoft technology to develop an IoT-enabled smart vaccine refrigerator that is small enough to fit in a van, ensures a constant temperature and automates vaccine storing, tracking and dispensing. It can deliver pro-active alerts if temperatures begin to fluctuate, and the cloud-based big data analytics helps health care providers get the right amount of vaccines to the right clinics.

    Image Source: Microsoft

  • Tyréns AB Smart Building

    4. Tyréns AB Smart Building

    Based in Sweden, Tyréns AB is a consulting firm that, among other projects, helps create better, safer and more sustainable buildings and communities. To help it understand how buildings are used, the firm embarked on a massive project with help from IBM, Intel, Yanzi and SVSi to install 1,000 IoT sensors throughout its own headquarters. Those sensors collected data on everything from the temperature in different rooms to how many people accessed different spaces to how often chairs in the conference rooms moved and even to how often the restrooms were used. (Did you know people make 3.6 visits to the bathroom on Monday but only 2.6 on Friday?) Analyzing the data collected has yielded incredibly valuable insights into building management that Tyréns has been able to apply to its own operations and share with clients.

    Image Source: IBM Video

  • GTX Shoes

    5. GTX Shoes

    Having a mobile phone in the sole of your shoe might seem like a gimmicky novelty, but it's more like a matter of life and death for people who buy GTX's SmartSoles. Developed with IoT technology from Telefónica, these wearables were designed for people with dementia, autism, cognitive impairments or other disabilities that put them at risk for getting lost. The SmartSoles automatically transmit data about the wearer's location, allowing caregivers and relatives to find their loved ones quickly and easily by accessing a Web portal or smartphone app. Because it's in the shoes, no one can see it, and the patient doesn't have to remember to carry or put on anything unusual. It costs $299.00, plus a $74.95 quarterly or $29.95 monthly fee.

    Image Source: GTX

  • Smart Lighting

    6. Atlas Global Solutions Lighting

    Smart lighting is becoming more popular with homeowners, but it is actually much more valuable in commercial and industrial settings. Atlas Global Solutions had a relatively new 200,000-square-foot manufacturing facility in Sutton, Mass., but an energy audit showed that the building's lighting system was using far too much energy — 1.3 million KW hours of electricity per year. By installing a smart LED lighting system from Digital Lumens, the company was able to reduce energy consumption by 1.25 million KW hours, a 55 percent decrease in the factory's total energy usage. The dramatic results helped the company earn an award from Energy Manager Today.

    Image Source: Digital Lumens

  • Cornelius Smart Beverage Dispensers

    7. Cornelius Smart Beverage Dispensers

    Cornelius makes drink dispensers for beer, cider, juices, teas, frozen drinks, and other beverages. The company wanted to transform its operations by adding IoT sensors to its devices, which would allow it to collect and analyze data on its machines. With help from developers at Trek10, the company built a new IoT system that leverages Amazon Web Services offerings like the AWS IoT platform, Lambda and Kinesis Firehouse. Today, the company is able to detect most maintenance and support needs proactively before receiving a call from customers, and it has also used the monitoring data to improve its supply chain and marketing efforts. Plus, the back-end IT infrastructure costs are extremely low — just a few dollars per machine per year.

    Image Source: Cornelius

  • Oranges

    8. Epic Fruit

    Based in Robertson, South Africa, Epic Fruit sends oranges, lemons, plums, peaches and nectarines all over the world. But like most produce, the company's fruits are sensitive to changes in temperature and require careful handling in order to arrive at supermarkets undamaged. To get a better picture of what was happening with its fruit in transit, the company installed an IoT system from MOST that automatically tracks location, temperature and other data about containers. It uploads that information to Internet-based dashboards automatically so that managers can see what is going on with their shipments. Based on this new intelligence, the company can make better decisions about where to send its shipments and when, and when it needs to take action to prevent damage to its produce.

    Image Source: Pixabay

Nearly everyone seems to agree that the Internet of Things (IoT) is going to be huge – and IoT is clearly on its way. But not everyone understands exactly how their own organizations might benefit from the new technology.

In a December 2017 forecast, IDC predicted that worldwide IoT spending will hit $772.5 billion this year, 14.6 percent more than last year. And the firm believes that spending growth will continue through at least 2021, when total revenues will reach $1.1 trillion.

It added that the industry doing the most spending, by far, in 2018 will be manufacturing ($189 billion), followed by transportation ($85 billion) and utilities ($73 billion). Revenues for things that all companies might use, like connected vehicles and smart buildings, will approach $92 billion, while consumers will spend around $62 billion on IoT devices.

But what, exactly, will all these organizations and consumers be buying?

IoT technology allows people to connect nearly anything to the Internet, and that's a pretty broad scope.

To help flesh out the IoT trend with some details, Datamation researched some case studies of organizations that have already begun using IoT technology to help them improve their business and/or the products and services they offer customers. The following slides highlight eight IoT case studies that were particularly interesting and offer an overview of the wide range of ways that IoT devices might be useful.

Image Source: Pixabay

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