Tuesday, July 27, 2021

Intel’s Next Processor Details Leaked?

A Taiwanese publication is reporting that Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) plans to release three Nehalem quad-core processors at the end of the fourth quarter, complete with specs on the new chips. DigiTimes, based in Taipei, cited motherboard vendors as its sources, many of which are also based in Taipei.

The official model names have not been set, but the specs list the three CPUs – with the codenames XE, P1 and MS3 – at clock speeds of 3.2GHz, 2.93GHz and 2.66GHz, respectively. All three have a thermal design power (TDP) envelope of 130W, 8MB L3 cache and come with simultaneous multi-threading (SMT) technology, which will allow for two threads per core, the report said.

In addition to the chips, Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) will also launch the X58 and ICH10 chipset combination to support these processors. These will use the QuickPath Interconnect (QPI) architecture, replacing the venerable frontside bus design.

The TDP seems rather high, given Intel’s top Core 2 processors run at 95 watts and the top Xeons run at 120 watts. Part of the reason is that the on-die memory controller will add a good 15 to 20 watts to the processor, since it is no longer a separate chip. But also, reasons the analysts, that’s the top end of the power rating.

“For all I know, that could be a maximum rating just so you could design a heat sink for worst case scenario,” said Tony Massimini, chief of technology for Semico Research. “It was probably something on a spec sheet, but right now I would guess those spec sheets are a boiler plate and will be the maxed on the top end. I would think when these [processors] are announced they will put out more precise spec sheets.”

Nathan Brookwood, research fellow with Insight 64, was of the same mind. “This is the max they can put into a desktop, air cooled platform. Clearly over time that number will get better,” he told InternetNews.com.

Intel declined to comment on the DigiTimes story, saying only that it was on track to release Nehalem in the fourth quarter of this year.

Nehalem is a major new architecture from Intel, one that finally puts the venerable frontside bus and external memory controller out to pasture for good. It adds a memory controller to the CPU and a high-speed interconnect, meaning the architecture will be very similar to AMD’s Athlon, Opteron and Phenom designs.

“For all I know, that could be a maximum rating just so you could design a heat sink for worst case scenario,” said Tony Massimini, chief of technology for Semico Research. “It was probably something on a spec sheet, but right now I would guess those spec sheets are a boiler plate and will be the maxed on the top end. I would think when these [processors] are announced they will put out more precise spec sheets.”

Nathan Brookwood, research fellow with Insight 64, was of the same mind. “This is the max they can put into a desktop, air cooled platform. Clearly over time that number will get better,” he told InternetNews.com.

Intel declined to comment on the DigiTimes story, saying only that it was on track to release Nehalem in the fourth quarter of this year.

Nehalem is a major new architecture from Intel, one that finally puts the venerable frontside bus and external memory controller out to pasture for good. It adds a memory controller to the CPU and a high-speed interconnect, meaning the architecture will be very similar to AMD’s Athlon, Opteron and Phenom designs.

“For all I know, that could be a maximum rating just so you could design a heat sink for worst case scenario,” said Tony Massimini, chief of technology for Semico Research. “It was probably something on a spec sheet, but right now I would guess those spec sheets are a boiler plate and will be the maxed on the top end. I would think when these [processors] are announced they will put out more precise spec sheets.”

Nathan Brookwood, research fellow with Insight 64, was of the same mind. “This is the max they can put into a desktop, air cooled platform. Clearly over time that number will get better,” he told InternetNews.com.

Intel declined to comment on the DigiTimes story, saying only that it was on track to release Nehalem in the fourth quarter of this year.

Nehalem is a major new architecture from Intel, one that finally puts the venerable frontside bus and external memory controller out to pasture for good. It adds a memory controller to the CPU and a high-speed interconnect, meaning the architecture will be very similar to AMD’s Athlon, Opteron and Phenom designs.

This article was first published on InternetNews.com. To read the full article, click here.

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