Top 10 Linux Tools

Posted November 14, 2017 By  Matt Hartley
  • Previous
    Top 10 Linux Tools
    Next

    Top 10 Linux Tools

    The Linux tools you need to do just about anything on the Linux desktop.
  • Previous
    CloneZilla
    Next

    CloneZilla

    Whether you need to clone and deploy a Linux desktop/server or simply make a disk image for restoration, CloneZilla is a great software choice. One of the things I love about CloneZilla is that you can clone disks for both Linux and Windows.

    CloneZilla allows its users to backup to a local backup drive or via their local network. Compression can also be utilized to save space or simply let CloneZilla do its job without any compression at all.

    Unlike proprietary disk and partition cloning tools, CloneZilla doesn't rely on fees or license keys. Simply download the software to bootable media and you're all set. The biggest thing to be wary of with CloneZilla is remembering which drive is the source and which is the backup destination.

  • Previous
    GIMP
    Next

    GIMP

    GIMP is a very powerful, yet often misunderstood image manipulation program. The misunderstood element of GIMP is that it's often seen as a Photoshop alternative. In reality, the two programs have more things different from one another than alike.

    One of the things that makes GIMP so powerful is that you can extend its functionality by using plugins. There are plugins that provides tablet support, advanced print options, even some limited CMYK color manipulation and more. GIMP shines best when making edits to RGB color images and tweaking existing photography.

    Outside of the fact that GIMP has a different workflow than Photoshop, it's important to note that the tool set offered also differs. The one thing the two editors have in common these days is the fact that both are available in a single window mode.

  • Previous
    Handbrake
    Next

    Handbrake

    If you're looking to backup your existing DVD collection for safe keeping, then Handbrake is a very important tool for making this easier. Thanks to Handbrake's clear feature layout and logical presets, ripping your DVD collection onto your hard drive has never been easier.

    Additional benefits to this software include its ability to clean up video errors, change aspect ratio and cooperate with videos being ripped into file containers. One amazing feature that must be mentioned is Handbrake's ability to handle DVD chapters.

    If you decide to venture beyond the offered presets, your success with Handbrake may vary from video to video. You'll also find that Handbrake shines at its best on PCs with enough horsepower to render video quickly and successfully without crashing.

  • Previous
    GParted
    Next

    GParted

    Before you install a Linux distro, you must first partition the drive it's to be installed on. Obviously, you could do this from the installation media. But how would you do this on a system that's already installed? Using GParted is one option that you might consider. I've found that GParted offers a solid GUI to the otherwise mystifying partitioning process. Even those who know how to partition from the command line will admit that having a clearly color coded visual representation of their partitions is extremely beneficial.

    GParted allows you to create, resize and even copy your computer's partition scheme. It supports Linux and Windows file systems. Additionally, it also makes partitioning your flash drives a snap when using GParted on an existing Linux installation.

  • Previous
    VirtualBox
    Next

    VirtualBox

    I've used a lot of different applications to run virtual machines over the years. Yet despite my best efforts, I kept coming back to VirtualBox. I highly recommend VirtualBox as it works with just about any distro both as a host and as a guest.

    Another benefit to VirtualBox is that you can pass USB devices through to the guest OS from your host. Not to worry though, you're still able to keep the mouse and keyboard setup as bi-directional devices thanks to the VirtualBox extensions add-on.

  • Previous
    HTOP
    Next

    HTOP

    While most Linux distros come with a GUI process manager, few of them have the raw functionality found with HTOP. Like TOP, HTOP provides you with a terminal friendly method of monitoring and manipulating your Linux processes. You can use HTOP to sort, filter and end processes with the utmost of ease.

    For any remotely modern Linux system, you'll find number representation for each of your computer's cores. This is invaluable in visualizing how your PC runs various programs. The only thing to keep in mind with HTOP is the help feature is about as robust as a MAN file. The details are there, however the formatting while reading it will feel like a wall of text.

  • Previous
    Powertop
    Next

    Powertop

    When you're freeing yourself from the tether of a plugged in laptop, you may find yourself on the receiving end of inexplicable battery drain. There are things you can do to address this issue, such as installing tlp to better manage power usage on your Linux system.

    Powertop adds value to the equation of power management in that you can see in a terminal output, what specifically is utilizing power. Whether its a rogue process or you forgot you had a video rendering (minimized), PowerTop is the best tool for managing your power consumption on Linux computers.

  • Previous
    Tilda
    Next

    Tilda

    I've run a number of terminals for my Linux boxes. The ones I enjoyed the most were accessible when needed and out of the way when they weren't. This is why I run Tilda. Unlike a desktop environment specific option, Tilda is highly customizable and can be setup to activate by pressing an assigned hotkey of your choosing.

    Another benefit to using Tilda over say, Guake, is that it's a bit lighter in terms of resources. Both are great programs, but I like the minimalism of Tilda overall.

  • Previous
    AptOnCD
    Next

    AptOnCD

    If you're running Ubuntu and have ever needed to install packages on a PC where Internet wasn't available, then I'm willing to bet AptOnCD was on your short list of possible solutions.

    Obviously you'd need to use the Internet at least once to get the packages you wish to add to a CD/DVD, however once this is done AptOnCD provides you with extremely smooth package portability for just about any situation.

  • Previous
    Glances
    Next

    Glances

    I would go so far as to suggest that Glances is the swiss army knife of the command line utility world. This is the best monitoring tool for running in a dedicated window. Use Glances to watch for serious errors, CPU spikes, disk IO issues, user vs system load issues and of course real time drive usage.

    The only downside of Glances is that it's a monitoring tool only. If you see an issues arise, you'll have to deep dive into your logs or related to do any advanced troubleshooting.

One of the benefits to using Linux on the desktop is that there’s no shortage of tools available for it. To further illustrate this point, I’m going to share what I consider to be the top 10 Linux tools.

This collection of Linux tools helps us in two distinct ways. It serves as an introduction to newer users that there are tools to do just about anything on Linux. Also, it reminds those of us who have used Linux for a number of years that the tools for just about any task is indeed, available.



0 Comments (click to add your comment)
Comment and Contribute

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have characters left.

 

 

IT Management Daily
Don't miss an article. Subscribe to our newsletter below.