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AI Resources: 9 Key Resources to Help You Launch AI

  • AI Resources: 9 Key Resources to Help You Launch AI

    artificial intelligence resources
    These online tools can help you learn about artificial intelligence and eventually deploy your own AI-based application.
  • 1. Coursera

    Coursera

    If you don't have any experience working with artificial intelligence, you can learn the basics from an online course. One of the better ones is Andrew Ng's machine learning class on Coursea. A world-renowned expert in the field of AI, Andrew Ng is a co-founder of Coursera, an adjunct professor at Stanford University and the former head of Baidu AI Group/Google Brain. His eleven-week course gets 4.9 stars from students, and it covers linear regression with one and multiple variables, linear algebra, logistic regression, regularization, neural networks, machine learning system design, support vector machines, unsupervised learning, dimensionality reduction, anomaly detection, recommender systems and more. You can access the course videos and assignments for free; full access with a certificate upon successful completion of the graded assignments costs $79.

  • 2. Quora AI Feed

    Quora AI Feed

    The Quora Artificial Intelligence feed has more than 817,000 followers, and the discussions on the site are often very interesting. In general, the content on this feed is not highly technical, but it does delve into some of the more philosophical aspects of AI research and provides a good general overview of the field. It also has a lot of questions and answers related to how you can get started in a career in AI.

    If you're looking for more in-depth technical information, some of Quora feeds on AI subspecialties get a little bit more into the nuts and bolts of how to use AI in applications. You might want to check out the feeds on Machine Learning (1.2 million followers), Deep Learning (267,000 followers), artificial neural networks (225,000 followers) or TensorFlow (27,000 followers).

  • 3. OpenAI

    OpenAI

    If you're ready for some more in-depth reading on artificial intelligence, you might want to check out the OpenAI website. OpenAI is a non-profit devoted to researching artificial general intelligence, the field devoted to creating machines that are capable of the same kind of thought as human beings. The organization regularly publishes research papers and interesting blogs on its website, and it also offers downloads of open source AI software.

  • 4. AWS SageMaker and DeepLens

    AWS SageMaker and DeepLens

    Once you're tired of reading about AI and you're ready to put it to practical use, one of the easiest and least expensive ways to get started is by using a cloud computing service. As the Deloitte report noted, “Cloud services make cognitive computing accessible and scalable to companies, and may be the way cognitive reaches broad adoption.”

    As the leading cloud computing provider, Amazon Web Services (AWS) has a long list of AI-related offerings, but two are particularly interesting for people and organizations that are just getting started with AI. The first is called SageMaker. It's a fully managed machine learning service that aims to make building, training and deploying models much faster and easier. It can support any AI framework and algorithms, but it comes pre-configured for TensorFlow and Apache MXNet frameworks and includes the ten most popular machine learning algorithms by default.

    The second, DeepLens is "the world's first deep learning-enabled video camera for developers." Designed for people who are learning about deep learning, it includes tutorials and projects to give users hands-on experience with computer vision. According to AWS, it "allows developers of all skill levels to get started with deep learning in less than 10 minutes."

  • 5. Google Cloud Machine Learning Engine

    Google Cloud Machine Learning Engine

    Of course, Google Cloud Platform has its own lineup of AI-related services. As the creator of the very popular TensorFlow machine learning framework, Google has earned a reputation as one of the leaders in the field of AI, and its Google Brain team continues to push the boundaries of research in the field.

    Similar to AWS SageMaker, Google's Cloud Machine Learning Engine is a fully managed service designed to make it easier to use machine learning capabilities. It is based on Google's TensorFlow technology, and it integrates with other Google Cloud services.

  • 6. Azure Machine Learning Studio

    Azure Machine Learning Studio

    Not to be left behind, Microsoft Azure also offers cloud-based artificial intelligence capabilities, including Azure Machine Learning Studio. It features an intuitive drag-and-drop interface that makes it easy to get started with predictive analytics, even if you don't know how to write code. And for more advanced users, it also supports Python and R. Notably, the studio webpage includes prominent links to tutorials and videos to help you learn more about machine learning.

  • 7. IBM Watson

    IBM Watson

    IBM Watson captured the public's imagination when it won the game show Jeopardy, and even people who don't know anything about artificial intelligence have often heard of Watson. IBM makes Watson's cognitive computing capabilities available to developers through IBM Cloud. The Watson service features tools for natural language conversation, knowledge discovery, computer vision, speech, language and even empathy. The website also includes a lot of stories about companies that have used Watson in unique and interesting ways.

  • 8. Kaggle

    Kaggle

    After you become proficient in working with artificial intelligence, you can put your new skills to the test at Kaggle. This Google-owned website features learning resources and discussion boards, but the real draw of Kaggle is its competitions. Organizations can post data science and machine learning challenges, and teams compete to come up with the best solutions. Some of the competitions earn only bragging rights, but many have cash prizes, some of which are quite high. For example, more than 3,700 teams recently took part in a contest sponsored by real estate Zillow that offered $1.2 million in prize money, and the site currently has two competitions with $100,000 at stake.

  • 9. Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence

    Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence

    If you've advanced to the point where you consider yourself an AI professional, you might be interested in the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), an industry group devoted to AI. It regularly hosts conferences and symposia, and it publishes a quarterly magazine for members. The website also includes a constantly updating set of links to news about the AI industry, and it has a library of scholarly papers that have appeared in the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research.

  • 1 of

AI Resources: 9 Key Resources to Help You Launch AI

  • 1 of
  • artificial intelligence resources

    AI Resources: 9 Key Resources to Help You Launch AI

    These online tools can help you learn about artificial intelligence and eventually deploy your own AI-based application.
  • Coursera

    1. Coursera

    If you don't have any experience working with artificial intelligence, you can learn the basics from an online course. One of the better ones is Andrew Ng's machine learning class on Coursea. A world-renowned expert in the field of AI, Andrew Ng is a co-founder of Coursera, an adjunct professor at Stanford University and the former head of Baidu AI Group/Google Brain. His eleven-week course gets 4.9 stars from students, and it covers linear regression with one and multiple variables, linear algebra, logistic regression, regularization, neural networks, machine learning system design, support vector machines, unsupervised learning, dimensionality reduction, anomaly detection, recommender systems and more. You can access the course videos and assignments for free; full access with a certificate upon successful completion of the graded assignments costs $79.

  • Quora AI Feed

    2. Quora AI Feed

    The Quora Artificial Intelligence feed has more than 817,000 followers, and the discussions on the site are often very interesting. In general, the content on this feed is not highly technical, but it does delve into some of the more philosophical aspects of AI research and provides a good general overview of the field. It also has a lot of questions and answers related to how you can get started in a career in AI.

    If you're looking for more in-depth technical information, some of Quora feeds on AI subspecialties get a little bit more into the nuts and bolts of how to use AI in applications. You might want to check out the feeds on Machine Learning (1.2 million followers), Deep Learning (267,000 followers), artificial neural networks (225,000 followers) or TensorFlow (27,000 followers).

  • OpenAI

    3. OpenAI

    If you're ready for some more in-depth reading on artificial intelligence, you might want to check out the OpenAI website. OpenAI is a non-profit devoted to researching artificial general intelligence, the field devoted to creating machines that are capable of the same kind of thought as human beings. The organization regularly publishes research papers and interesting blogs on its website, and it also offers downloads of open source AI software.

  • AWS SageMaker and DeepLens

    4. AWS SageMaker and DeepLens

    Once you're tired of reading about AI and you're ready to put it to practical use, one of the easiest and least expensive ways to get started is by using a cloud computing service. As the Deloitte report noted, “Cloud services make cognitive computing accessible and scalable to companies, and may be the way cognitive reaches broad adoption.”

    As the leading cloud computing provider, Amazon Web Services (AWS) has a long list of AI-related offerings, but two are particularly interesting for people and organizations that are just getting started with AI. The first is called SageMaker. It's a fully managed machine learning service that aims to make building, training and deploying models much faster and easier. It can support any AI framework and algorithms, but it comes pre-configured for TensorFlow and Apache MXNet frameworks and includes the ten most popular machine learning algorithms by default.

    The second, DeepLens is "the world's first deep learning-enabled video camera for developers." Designed for people who are learning about deep learning, it includes tutorials and projects to give users hands-on experience with computer vision. According to AWS, it "allows developers of all skill levels to get started with deep learning in less than 10 minutes."

  • Google Cloud Machine Learning Engine

    5. Google Cloud Machine Learning Engine

    Of course, Google Cloud Platform has its own lineup of AI-related services. As the creator of the very popular TensorFlow machine learning framework, Google has earned a reputation as one of the leaders in the field of AI, and its Google Brain team continues to push the boundaries of research in the field.

    Similar to AWS SageMaker, Google's Cloud Machine Learning Engine is a fully managed service designed to make it easier to use machine learning capabilities. It is based on Google's TensorFlow technology, and it integrates with other Google Cloud services.

  • Azure Machine Learning Studio

    6. Azure Machine Learning Studio

    Not to be left behind, Microsoft Azure also offers cloud-based artificial intelligence capabilities, including Azure Machine Learning Studio. It features an intuitive drag-and-drop interface that makes it easy to get started with predictive analytics, even if you don't know how to write code. And for more advanced users, it also supports Python and R. Notably, the studio webpage includes prominent links to tutorials and videos to help you learn more about machine learning.

  • IBM Watson

    7. IBM Watson

    IBM Watson captured the public's imagination when it won the game show Jeopardy, and even people who don't know anything about artificial intelligence have often heard of Watson. IBM makes Watson's cognitive computing capabilities available to developers through IBM Cloud. The Watson service features tools for natural language conversation, knowledge discovery, computer vision, speech, language and even empathy. The website also includes a lot of stories about companies that have used Watson in unique and interesting ways.

  • Kaggle

    8. Kaggle

    After you become proficient in working with artificial intelligence, you can put your new skills to the test at Kaggle. This Google-owned website features learning resources and discussion boards, but the real draw of Kaggle is its competitions. Organizations can post data science and machine learning challenges, and teams compete to come up with the best solutions. Some of the competitions earn only bragging rights, but many have cash prizes, some of which are quite high. For example, more than 3,700 teams recently took part in a contest sponsored by real estate Zillow that offered $1.2 million in prize money, and the site currently has two competitions with $100,000 at stake.

  • Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence

    9. Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence

    If you've advanced to the point where you consider yourself an AI professional, you might be interested in the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), an industry group devoted to AI. It regularly hosts conferences and symposia, and it publishes a quarterly magazine for members. The website also includes a constantly updating set of links to news about the AI industry, and it has a library of scholarly papers that have appeared in the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research.

Demand for artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning is skyrocketing.

According to IDC, global AI spending is growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 54.4 percent, and by 2020, the AI market could top $46 billion.

Enterprises have begun experimenting with AI, and many have experienced at least some success. Deloitte's recently published 2018 Technology Industry Outlook noted, “In a recent Deloitte survey, 83 percent of respondents said their companies have already achieved either moderate (53 percent) or substantial (30 percent) benefits from their work with these cognitive technologies.”

All that demand has IT professionals scrambling to add AI skills to their resumes. But many aren't sure how to get started.

The following slideshow features nine resources that can help beginners get started with AI and hone their skills over time. It includes online classes, AI-related websites, cloud computing services, AI research, journals and other online tools to help you develop your understanding of artificial intelligence.

Image source: Pixabay

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