Friday, April 16, 2021

Intel Reveals Canterwood Server Chipset

By Enterprise IT Planet Staff

The world’s largest chipmaker has released details on an upcoming chipset based on the i875P that is designed for servers running on a single Pentium 4 processor. Codenamed “Canterwood ES” by Intel, the chipset will inherit many of the specs found in the original i875P (Canterwood), most notably its 800MHz front side bus.

Due out this fall, the new chipset will also support PCI-X, dual channel DDR, Serial ATA, USB 2.0 and AGP 8X graphics subsystem.

In 2004, the chipmaker plans to release two new chipsets for Xeon servers with PCI Express support, the “Twin Castle” chipset for Xeon MP processors and the “Lindenhurst” for two-way Xeon servers.

PCI Express is a high-speed, serial point-to-point I/O interconnect. Both chipsets will also support DDR2, a high-speed, high-bandwidth memory technology that also keeps cooler than typical memory chips.

Intel also announced that the company has shipped 1 million chipsets for enterprise servers and workstations in the nearly 15 months since it released the E7500 chipset for two-way servers in early 2002.

Later the same year, the company followed up with the E7205 chipset for Pentium 4 workstations, E7505 for Xeon workstations and the Xeon server E7501 with a 533 MHz bus.

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