Open Source Replacements for Windows XP

Posted June 8, 2016 By  Cynthia Harvey

Microsoft officially ended support for Windows XP on April 8, 2014. That means the company is no longer patching newly discovered security vulnerabilities in the operating system, and people who continue to use it are opening themselves up to security risks.

However, according to NetMarketShare, more than a quarter of all PCs (27.69 percent) were still running Windows XP in March of this year.

Why would people continue using a twelve-year-old operating system that would put them at risk?

No doubt, many are home users who simply aren't very technology savvy and/or may not have the desire or the money to upgrade to a newer version of Windows. Some probably have older, underpowered PCs that can't run Windows 7 or 8. And others have specific software—often custom business applications—that only runs on Windows XP.

Fortunately, the open source community has free operating systems that meet the needs of users in all of these situations. This month we've put together a list of 50 different applications that can replace Windows XP. It's organized into several different categories. Those that are easiest for beginners to use come first, followed by lightweight operating systems that can run on old hardware, then operating systems that are particularly tailored for business users and open source operating systems that aren't based on Linux. The list ends with a few applications that aren't complete operating systems but do allow users to run their existing XP software from Linux.

As always, if you have another Linux distribution or other application that you think should have been on this list, feel free to write a note in the comments section below.

Before we get to the list itself, here's a some quick background for Windows XP users who aren't familiar with Linux or open source software. Linux is an operating system that anyone can use free of charge. In addition, anyone can see the source code for Linux and modify it however they like. Because anyone can tweak it, it comes in thousands of different versions, which are known as "distributions." Different Linux distributions use different interfaces or "desktops," which determine how the operating system looks on the screen. Unlike Windows, Linux distributions generally come with lots of free applications already built in, so users don't have to pay extra for office productivity software, security software, games or other applications.

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