Android vs. iPhone for Business: 8 Key Points

Posted August 15, 2016 By  Cynthia Harvey
  • Previous
    iPhone vs. Android
    Next

    Android vs. iPhone for Business Users

    Which mobile operating system is best for business? We compare iPhone vs. Android in eight different categories, including hardware, apps, storage, customization, security, backup, management and personal assistant.
  • Previous
    iPhone vs. Android: Hardware
    Next

    1. Android vs. iPhone: Hardware

    The big difference between iPhone vs. Android when it comes to hardware is the number of choices available. On the Android side, you have literally hundreds of smartphones with a wide range of price points. As the Android website says, "Whether you’re looking for a waterproof phone, the longest battery life or a low-light camera, there’s an Android phone for you." If you want the latest iPhone, you have basically two choices: the iPhone 6s or the larger iPhone 6s Plus. Still, while Apple doesn't offer a lot of choices, these are two exceptionally well-made smartphones. So in this category, we're declaring a tie.

    Advantage: Tie

  • Previous
    iPhone vs. Android: Apps
    Next

    2. Android vs. iPhone: Apps

    At this point, Apple's App Store and Google Play have so many thousands of apps available that it's pointless to compare them; nearly all of the top business apps are going to be available for both platforms. Apple has a partnership with IBM that might make the iPhone slightly more attractive for enterprises that use a lot of IBM software, but on the other hand, Android integrates with Google's Web-based productivity apps, making Android attractive for companies that use Google's products. Again, this category is a virtual dead heat.

    Advantage: Tie

  • Previous
    3. iPhone vs. Android: Storage
    Next

    3. Android vs. iPhone: Storage

    When you first purchased your most recent smartphone, it probably seemed like it had plenty of storage. But it usually doesn't take too long before all that storage space gets filled, even if you purchased the maximum available. This is one area where the iPhone vs. Android debate becomes a little more one-sided. Some (but definitely not all) Android devices give users the option of adding a flash card for extra storage. While you can buy an iPhone with up to 128 GB of storage space, you can add a card to expand the Samsung Galaxy S7 storage to 256 GB, giving the Android phone a clear advantage.

    Advantage: Android

  • Previous
    iPhone vs. Android: Customization
    Next

    4. Android vs. iPhone: Customization

    When it comes to customization, Android is again the clear winner. The iPhone offers only limited options for changing the look of your phone's screen, but Android lets you customize almost everything. In addition, the Android homescreen gives you the option of adding widgets, which allow you to see up-to-the-minute data without opening an app. For example, you can add widgets that track the weather or your company's stock price. It's a definite advantage for busy office workers.

    Advantage: Android

  • Previous
    iPhone vs. Android: Security
    Next

    5. Android vs. iPhone: Security

    On the security question, iPhone comes out ahead. Apple vets every app that it allows into its App Store, making it much, much less likely that any apps business users download will be malware. In addition, Apple builds security features like Touch ID and encryption right into its hardware. On the Android side, built-in security features vary by phone model, so it's up to buyers to make sure that they get the level of security they need. And despite Google's efforts to crack down on malicious apps, malware still crops up in the Google Play store.

    Advantage: iPhone

  • Previous
    iPhone vs. Android: Backup
    Next

    6. Android vs. iPhone: Backup

    If you have sensitive business information on your smartphone, having a backup is an absolute must. After all, if your device gets lost or stolen, you need a way to keep working. Here the iPhone again has an advantage because it automatically backs up your data to iCloud. With Android phones, various apps give you the option of backing up some of your information, but it's simply not as seamless and comprehensive as what the iPhone offers.

    Advantage: iPhone

  • Previous
    iPhone vs. Android: Management
    Next

    7. Android vs. iPhone: Management

    In recent years, both Apple and Google have taken steps to make their mobile operating systems more attractive to enterprise IT managers. The latest version of iOS offers features that seamlessly manage both corporate and personal data on the user's device, offering the security protections necessary for business data without hampering user productivity. It also offers features for streamlining app deployment for corporate employees and managing corporate-owned devices. Android at Work also separates business and personal data and gives IT a way to erase corporate data if a device goes missing. In this category, the iPhone vs. Android race is again a tie.

    Advantage: Tie

  • Previous
    iPhone vs. Android: Personal Assistant
    Next

    8. Android vs. iPhone: Personal Assistant

    Both Apple and Google offer personal assistants. The iPhone has Siri, and Android has Google Now. Comparing these two is a little more difficult because Siri does a better job of recognizing some voices and accents, while Google Now does a better job with others. Siri can sometimes do a better job of responding to colloquial expressions, but Google Now learns your habits and offers information before you even ask for it. When critics and publications compare the two head-to-head, Google Now generally (but not always) comes out ahead. In this category, we're going to give a slight edge to Android.

    Advantage: Android

  • Previous
    iPhone vs. Android: Summary
    Next

    Android vs. iPhone: Summary

    If you've been keeping score, here's how things stand: iPhone came out ahead in the security and backup categories; Android won for storage, customization and personal assistant; hardware, apps and management were a tie. On a straight points basis, that would make Android the winner, but that doesn't really tell the whole story.

    Different business users will have different priorities. If you work in the financial industry, perhaps security is such a big issue that you feel you need to go with an iPhone. Or perhaps you have a very fast-paced job where productivity is extremely important, making Android more attractive because of its customization capabilities and personal assistant.

    Both mobile platforms offer features important to business users—it's a matter of your priorities. In your particular line of work, perhaps a category we haven't covered here, such as ruggedness or battery life, is more of a priority. In the end, it really is a personal decision, and you'll have to weigh the relative merits iPhone vs. Android for yourself.

The relative merits of Android vs. iPhone, from a consumer's point of view, remains a hot debate. Yet as mobile plays an ever larger role in business, the classic Android vs. iPhone debate rises to a new level.

Is one mobile platform clearly better for business users? Does one of the dominant mobile operating systems offer an advantage for employees, in terms of the critical elements that drive profit?

As of the beginning of this year, Apple was the number one smartphone manufacturer in the U.S. with 43.6 percent of the market, according to comScore. However, in the operating system race, Android came out above iOS with 52.8 percent of the market. Worldwide, Android has an even bigger lead with 63.67 percent of the market, according to NetMarketshare. But being popular doesn't necessarily mean that Android is the best option for business use.

In this slideshow, we'll examine the advantages and disadvantages of Android vs. iPhone in eight different categories important to business users: hardware, apps, storage, customization, security, backup, management and personal assistant.



0 Comments (click to add your comment)
Comment and Contribute

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have characters left.

 

 

IT Management Daily
Don't miss an article. Subscribe to our newsletter below.