11 New Open Source Development Tools

  • 1. .NET

    .NET
    In 2014, Microsoft announced plans to open source its .NET development framework. The .NET Foundation website offers all the .NET tools the company has open sourced so far, including the Roslyn compiler. You can also find the .NET tools on GitHub. Operating System: Windows

  • 2. Bazel

    Bazel
    Google released a beta version of the Bazel build system this month. It's ideal for environments with a very large shared code repository, a variety of languages and platforms in use, and automated testing and release processes . Operating System: Linux, OS X
  • 3. Falcor

    Falcor
    Falcor describes itself as "a JavaScript library for efficient data fetching." Created by Netflix, it allows Web apps to get and display data very quickly, improving the end user experience. It is still in developer preview status. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X
  • 4. Jsonnet

    Jsonnet
    As you might guess from the name, the Jsonnet configuration language was designed to simplify the process of writing JSON. Developers can use it to help organize JSON data. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X
  • 5. Neovim

    Neovim
    Generations of Emacs-hating developers have sworn by Vim as the only text editor they'll use for coding. Neovim is a new take on the classic tool with more powerful plugins, better GUI architecture and improved embedding support. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X
  • 6. Nuclide

    Nuclide
    Created by Facebook, Nuclide is an integrated development environment that supports both mobile and Web development. It is built on top of Atom, and it can integrate with Flow, Hack and Mercurial. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X
  • 7. Office UI Fabric

    Office UI Fabric
    Just last month, Microsoft made Office UI Fabric generally available on GitHub. It's a front-end fabric that allows developers to build Office-like Web apps and add-ins. Operating System: Windows
  • 8. Parse SDKs

    Parse SDKs
    Owned by Facebook, Parse is a mobile backend as a service that simplifies the process of creating mobile apps. Earlier this year, it open sourced three of its SDKs, and it promised to release the rest in the future. Operating System: iOS, OS X, Android
  • 9. React

    React
    React is "a JavaScript library for building user interfaces." It provides the "View" component in model–view–controller (MVC) software architecture and is specifically designed for one-page applications with data that changes over time. Operating System: OS Independent
  • 10. Sleepy Puppy

    Sleepy Puppy
    Released in August, Netflix's Sleepy Puppy helps Web developers avoid cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities. It allows developers and security staff to capture, manage and track XSS issues. Operating System: OS Independent
  • 11. YAPF

    YAPF
    Short for "Yet Another Python Formatter," YAPF reformats Python code so that it conforms to the style guide and looks good. It's a Google-owned project. Operating System: OS Independent
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11 New Open Source Development Tools

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  • .NET

    1. .NET

    In 2014, Microsoft announced plans to open source its .NET development framework. The .NET Foundation website offers all the .NET tools the company has open sourced so far, including the Roslyn compiler. You can also find the .NET tools on GitHub. Operating System: Windows

  • Bazel

    2. Bazel

    Google released a beta version of the Bazel build system this month. It's ideal for environments with a very large shared code repository, a variety of languages and platforms in use, and automated testing and release processes . Operating System: Linux, OS X
  • Falcor

    3. Falcor

    Falcor describes itself as "a JavaScript library for efficient data fetching." Created by Netflix, it allows Web apps to get and display data very quickly, improving the end user experience. It is still in developer preview status. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X
  • Jsonnet

    4. Jsonnet

    As you might guess from the name, the Jsonnet configuration language was designed to simplify the process of writing JSON. Developers can use it to help organize JSON data. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X
  • Neovim

    5. Neovim

    Generations of Emacs-hating developers have sworn by Vim as the only text editor they'll use for coding. Neovim is a new take on the classic tool with more powerful plugins, better GUI architecture and improved embedding support. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X
  • Nuclide

    6. Nuclide

    Created by Facebook, Nuclide is an integrated development environment that supports both mobile and Web development. It is built on top of Atom, and it can integrate with Flow, Hack and Mercurial. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X
  • Office UI Fabric

    7. Office UI Fabric

    Just last month, Microsoft made Office UI Fabric generally available on GitHub. It's a front-end fabric that allows developers to build Office-like Web apps and add-ins. Operating System: Windows
  • Parse SDKs

    8. Parse SDKs

    Owned by Facebook, Parse is a mobile backend as a service that simplifies the process of creating mobile apps. Earlier this year, it open sourced three of its SDKs, and it promised to release the rest in the future. Operating System: iOS, OS X, Android
  • React

    9. React

    React is "a JavaScript library for building user interfaces." It provides the "View" component in model–view–controller (MVC) software architecture and is specifically designed for one-page applications with data that changes over time. Operating System: OS Independent
  • Sleepy Puppy

    10. Sleepy Puppy

    Released in August, Netflix's Sleepy Puppy helps Web developers avoid cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities. It allows developers and security staff to capture, manage and track XSS issues. Operating System: OS Independent
  • YAPF

    11. YAPF

    Short for "Yet Another Python Formatter," YAPF reformats Python code so that it conforms to the style guide and looks good. It's a Google-owned project. Operating System: OS Independent

These tools were first released or open sourced within the past couple of years and are worth checking out.

 

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