Three Myths About Cloud Computing: Page 2

Surveys of IT managers reveal a good deal more confusion and ambivalence about cloud computing than the hype suggests.
Posted October 18, 2011
By

Larry Marion


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You can see the dilemma faced by many organizations—they are eager to adopt cloud computing, but know their organizations' culture, workloads or other factors preclude a massive adoption.

When asked two separate questions – 1) which type of IT infrastructure will your organization have in three years and 2) which approach will be the best in three years – they have a severe case of cognitive dissonance.

Six out of ten say they'll still have a traditional data center in 2014, but less than four out of ten think that is the best approach at that point.

Similarly, while a third says they'll have some sort of cloud infrastructure in place in three years, almost two thirds say cloud is the best approach. Here's the table with the data:

support and best approach to cloud computing

Source: Bloomberg Businessweek Research Services, 2011

In other words, cloud computing is not the panacea for all of the ills of managing IT. Many of the challenges don't go away, and new ones rise up. And anyone who thinks that there will be huge piles of abandoned data center mainframes littering corporate trash bins anytime soon has been drinking too much cloud Kool-Aid.

For more information about the BBRS study and the reports produced by Pricewaterhouse about the future of cloud and IT outsourcing, visit this page of the PwC web site. The HBR AS study is available at this page of the Microsoft web site.


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Tags: cloud computing, private cloud, public cloud


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