Ubuntu App Building Tools: Illumination, Quickly: Page 2

Newbie and advanced developers can easily create software for Ubuntu and other Linux desktops.
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Commercial video editor LightWorks, is slowly making its way onto the Linux desktop. There is also movement within the video game arena as well, since Electronic Artsbegan releasing games into the Ubuntu Software Center.

More now than ever before, big brands are beginning to take Ubuntu Linux very seriously. And while there is still a long way to go before we see applications such as Photoshop or Microsoft Office on the Ubuntu desktop, suddenly the idea doesn't sound as far-fetched. Don't think Microsoft would ever offer desktop software to the casual desktop Linux enthusiast? Think again – they updated Skype when the old guard at the company didn't.

New commercial applications joining established community-based software choices only serves to strengthen the list of choices for end users. It's an exciting time to be using the Ubuntu desktop and Linux in general. Finally, after many years of "making due," we're seeing fantastic applications come forth to makeup for the shortcomings that come from using a desktop that is largely ignored by commercial software players.

Not to be outdone, however, newer community-based applications such as OpenShot, Kazam, and Jitsi, among others, have made using Ubuntu full time easier than ever. Compared to a mere few years ago, I find that I don't need to run Windows for anything any longer.

Don't get me wrong, there is still room for improvement, but overall, Ubuntu and Linux as a whole are gaining serious traction among users and developers alike.

Keeping the ball rolling

In order to keep the momentum building among developers and potential developers, the Ubuntu team is running a contest in which the best software wins a brand new notebook from System76. The rules are fairly simple, and the development options appear to basically come down to developing software in Python and GTK.

For obvious reasons, the Ubuntu team is using this event to promote their Quickly development tool. Yet I have heard that using alternative methods of development are welcome. This means tools like Illumination Software Creator or more advanced development methods are allowed.

So the contest may garner attention from advanced developers, not just newbies. The results will be interesting, to say the least. We should know how it all pans out by July 9th.

When the dust settles, this contest will be a strong indicator as to whether the momentum that Ubuntu has seen on the development front will continue. There is no question that the software center has proven to be fairly effective in gaining attention from video game developers. It will be interesting to see if any new and exciting enterprise applications also make their way into the repositories anytime soon.

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Tags: Linux, development, Ubuntu, app

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