Free Newsletters :

Choosing the Best Linux Desktop: KDE, Unity, GNOME : Page 3

Pros and cons of the KDE, Unity, GNOME 2, and GNOME 3 Linux desktops.
(Page 3 of 4)

Go directly to the review of each Linux desktop:

GNOME 2

GNOME 3

KDE

Unity

KDE

The release of KDE 4.0 several years ago was a major break from earlier releases. It was also a public relations disaster, for reasons that were not entirely the project's fault. However, the series 4 releases than followed soon proved their worth.

Today, with release 4.7 due in a few weeks, KDE's pace of innovation has slowed, but so has most of the criticism -- although some people mistakenly believe that they know what KDE is like from obsolete rumors.

Pro

 

  1. With the Folder View widget, you can maintain multiple icons sets, each for a different purpose. You can either leave these icon sets in floating windows, or else fill the desktop with one of them and change it as needed. Either way, you reduce clutter, and relieve the need to evolve one set of icons that fits all your computing.
  2.  

  3. The KDE desktop continues to include virtual workspaces to increase your screen real estate. However, KDE also includes Activities, or multiple screens, each of which can be customized separately. Although the distinction between workspaces and Activities can be confusing, the net result is more flexibility, especially when combined with Folder View.
  4.  

  5. While KDE continues to innovate, it rarely enforces a single workflow. If you don't like Folder View or Activities, you can ignore them and work on a single screen. Similarly, if you don't like the KDE menu, you can switch to the Classic accordion-style menu or to the alternative menu Lancelot.

 

Con

 

  1. The KDE 4 series is different enough from early releases that the logic of features like Folder View or Activities can escape new users. It might help to remember that KDE abstracts functions so that one can easily replace another -- for example, while you need a shell (or containment, as KDE calls it) to work in KDE, you can choose which one you actually use: for instance, a normal Desktop, a Newspaper Layout, or a Search and Launch. Still, the possible choices can be overwhelming for someone who just wants to get some work done.
  2.  

  3. Technically, GNOME and KDE are desktops. However, more than one user has remarked that they are so different that they almost seem separate operating systems. Each not only has its own ecosystem of utilities and widgets or applets, but also its own design philosophy. As a result, if you haven't used KDE before, you may need time to adjust. In fact, the temptation might be just to reject it because it's new.
  4.  

  5. As applications like digiKam, Amarok, and K3B show, KDE has a tendency toward apps that are as fully-featured as possible. This tendency creates organizational problems that KDE and associated apps haven't fully mastered. In many parts of KDE, you can still find menus or tabs that are essentially a dumping ground for features and that make no attempt at organization.

Go directly to the review of each Linux desktop:

GNOME 2

GNOME 3

KDE

Unity


Page 3 of 4

Previous Page
1 2 3 4
Next Page





0 Comments (click to add your comment)
Comment and Contribute

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have characters left.