Best Linux Software of All Time: Page 2

Ten top picks for best Linux software to get the most from your desktop.
Posted February 9, 2015

Matt Hartley

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7. Audacity – I'd have to rank Audacity up there with LibreOffice and Gimp in terms of its importance to my work flow. I use this software that often, it's critically important to me. I love the fact that on any platform I happen to be using, I can pop into Audacity and edit multiple sound files into a single masterpiece. I'm able to easily work with WAV, MP3, Ogg Vorbis and FLAC files. It's this kind of audio editing flexibility that keeps me happy with Audacity.

I also find it handy that Audacity offers so many great tools and filters, while still keeping the user interface easy enough for a newbie to pick it up quickly. Would I suggest that this is professional audio editing software? Not entirely, however if Audour is more than you bargained for, Audacity might be just the ticket for quick and advanced editing work.

Kdenlive – After watching countless video editors come and go, the one video editing software that has always been there for me is Kdenlive. Yes, Lightworks has professional level software with options not found in Kdenlive. For me, though, Kdenlive offers a familiar work flow. And these days, the software is very stable to use.

I love that I can add 10 or more tacks of video/audio to Kdenlive and it never misses a beat. It works as expected and I don't find myself re-thinking my video editing projects under Linux software. At some point, I'll familiarize myself with Lightworks. But for now, Kdenlive is my goto software for basic editing, effects, compositing and green screen work.

9. insync – No Google Drive support for your Linux installation? No problem, insync has your back. Not to be confused with the defunct Boy Band from years ago, insync is a Google Drive account without Google's limitations. Without the training wheels, this software allows me to run multiple accounts, convert docs, and share really easily.

At a far deeper level, it's here and available to Linux users now – today. While the rest of the Linux community complains about the lack of an official Google Drive client, I've been happily using insync for a while now. The fine print to be aware of is that you have to dive into your petty cash and invest a whopping $15 one time. But that's it, you're in for good after that.

10. DropboxDropboxfalls into the same category for me as Skype and not only because it's proprietary software. I categorize it with Skype in that it's one of those things that isn't that great for you, but is difficult to live without. Sure, there are other technologies out there that are open source and you can even host them yourself. However it's difficult to compare it to Dropbox's dirt cheap data rates.

Moving past the "why it's bad for you" aspect, Dropbox is a handy way to share files and to make music available on your smart phone. Perhaps the coolest part is that you can share select files with the public, using a special link.

Best Linux Software: Your Choices?

There are still a number of Linux apps that I could have included. Krita, Blender, Steam, among countless others. But these are the applications that I feel represent the very best of what Linux software has to offer on the desktop.

Perhaps you'd like to share your favorite applications? Hit the Comments and let me know which applications you believe are the best all time Linux apps ever released.

Also see: Best Linux Desktop: Top 10 Candidates

The 9 Best Linux Distros

100 Open Source Replacements for Expensive Applications

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

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Tags: Linux, Linux apps

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