Why Google's 'Smart TV' Will Succeed: Page 2

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Because much of the app deployment will be HTML5 and browser-based, it should enable "Smart TV" to be usable or accessible from competitive mobile devices, including Apple iPads.

When Can You Buy One?

Dragonpoint Smart TV sets should become available to the public in time for the holidays this year. In the meantime, Google will be working with application developers to make ready apps and services for the new platform.

Google's rivals have tried and failed to launch roughly comparable initiatives. Microsoft's Windows Media Center, WebTV and Microsoft TV; and Apple's Apple TV product; Yahoo's Connected TV initiative; and others have all tried to bring together computers, the Internet and television into single products. But those products are now considered niche efforts that failed to change the way mainstream users watch TV.

I think Google's initiative is different. For starters, it's far more open, and uses open standards. Secondly, Google appears to be making an effort to enable a wide range of companies and application developers to make money, rather than simply trying to keep all the money for itself. That effort should result in wide-spread buy-in.

Also, its open nature might make the initiative more acceptable to Hollywood, which may balk at Apple's platforms, which always reserve a lot of control and revenue to Apple.

It's also the right time. All of Microsoft's major TV efforts were premature -- the market, the Internet, the application platform, Internet programming technologies and protocols were all not ready for the kind of broad-based effort Google is spearheading.

Do you want your Google TV? I do. And I think the TV-PC convergence will finally happen -- at last!

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Tags: Google, convergence, Apple TV, Smart TV, TV Everywhere

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