As Life Moves Online, Virtual Death Follows: Page 2

While most every service has long been available online, handling the passing of loved ones has only recently made in-roads.
Posted January 22, 2013

Jeff Vance

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A QR code lets authorized executors access their loved one's memories and even share them during the service. The QR code can also be used to link to content in a funeral program, in an obituary or even on a headstone. Mourners can then see what the deceased actually wanted them to remember.

Similarly, streaming funeral services have been catching on. Most notably, the memorial services of Michael Jackson and Whitney Houston were streamed online to millions of viewers worldwide.

"Webcasting is a tool that is growing in popularity – and one I predict will explode over the next five years. I believe it’s an important technology that will help the funeral profession prove that we’re investing in technologies to adapt to our customer’s changing behaviors and needs," wrote Krystal Penrose, blog manager for FuneralOne, in a recent post. FuneralOne helps mortuaries stream memorial services over the web. In 2011, their clients streamed more than 17,000 services over the Internet.

We're no longer a culture that lives within a hundred miles of where we grew up. We're a mobile, migratory culture, and that means that we can only attend a small portion of the services that our parents or grandparents would have.

It's no surprise, then, that streaming memorial services is slowly moving into the mainstream, as are eulogies and even shopping for a funeral home. It may seem morbid to some, but in an age when you can buy a casket at Wal-Mart, all of these e-funeral services may actually be injecting some humanity back into a life event that has become far too sterile.

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Tags: Web, Internet

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