Certification Watch: Microsoft Adds .NET Developer Credentials

Certification news involving Microsoft, CompTIA, Sun Microsystems and computer forensics.
Posted February 25, 2002

Anne Martinez

Certification Watch is provided by GoCertify.com, a gathering place and resource center for people interested in computer professional certification.

It's only February and already the certification marketplace is gearing up for a busy year. In this issue we report on four new and pending certifications.

Microsoft Announces New .NET Developer Credentials
As part of the big Microsoft .NET rollout, Microsoft is launching an entirely new developer credential, plus adding a .NET version of the MCSD certification. Microsoft Certified Application Developer (MCAD) for Microsoft .NET, fits squarely between the basic Certified Professional (MCP) and the advanced Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer (MCSD) titles. It requires passing two core exams focusing on a particular language track (either Visual Basic or C#) and one elective.

The new MCSD title, Microsoft Certified Application Developer (MCAD) for Microsoft .NET, adds an additional two core exams to the MCAD requirements, including a .NET version of the old familiar Analyzing Requirements and Defining Solution Architectures. Current MCSDs will NOT be required to update to the .NET track to remain certified. For the full story, see the GoCertify.com article, Understanding Microsoft's New Developer Credentials.

CompTIA To Build New Entry-Level Security Certification
Computer and network security has been such a hot topic in recent months that it should come as no surprise that the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is planning to add a security certification to its portfolio. CompTIA, sponsor of a family of vendor-neutral certifications including the popular A+, recently announced an initiative to create a vendor-neutral, foundation level security certification. The new designation will address firewalls, viruses, user authentication and encryption, among other topics. The official name of the new certification has not been decided yet, but Certification Watch has learned that it won't be Security+. Look for a beta exam in Fall 2002.

Computer Forensics Certification Launched
Guidance Software has created a program to certify expertise in the interesting field of recovering computer-based evidence, using EnCase computer forensic software and proper forensic methodology. The EnCase Certified Examiner (EnCE) title isn't an entry-level title: prerequisites include substantial experience and training requirements. Applicants who meet the prerequisites go on to take two exams. The first exam is in the familiar, computer-based format administered by Prometric testing centers. The second is a take home practical exam that requires examining evidence files and producing a report. See the full details on this intriguing addition to the certification marketplace.

Sun Certified Backup And Recovery Engineer Goes Live
All of the exams that qualify as requirements for the Sun Certified Backup And Recovery Engineer designation are now live. Candidates can pass either the VERITAS NetBackup and Solstice Backup exam to earn the designation. The tests are designed to measure knowledge of reliable backup methodology, restoring data and meeting design requirements and cost $150 each. They are available through Prometric testing centers.

The complete current issue of Certification Watch can be found at GoCertify.com.

Anne Martinez is the author of Cheap Web Tricks: Build and Promote a Successful Web Site Without Spending A Dime and Get Certified and Get Ahead. She also is the founder of GoCertify.com.

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